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diplomatic staff in advance of a crisis, from central america to khartoum, from tunisia to yemen, from egypt and mali to and eyes. while dod does not have the primary responsibility for the security of u.s. diplomatic facilities around the world, we do work closely with the state department and support them as requested. in the months prior to the benghazi attack, as i said, we had received from the intelligence community, almost 300 reports on upon threats to american facilities around the world. over the course of the day on september 11th, general dempsey and i received a number of reports of possible threats to u.s. facilities. including those in cairo, egypt. but there are no reports of imminent threats to u.s. personnel or facilities in benghazi. by our best estimate, the incident at the temporary mission facility in benghazi began at about 3:42 p.m., eastern daylight time, on september 11th. the embassy in tripoli was notified of the attacks almost immediately, and within 1 -- 17 minutes of the initial report, africom directed an unmanned surveillance aircraft that was nearby to repos
throughout in the world and not all, obviously are benghazi or tripoli or tunisia. the reality is that in most countries, in the world, we can rely on the host country to provide security. they're there. they're willing to do it. they do a good job. there are some of these embassies in some of these more volatile countries that are of concern. and those were the nineteen that we're designated by the state department as ones we had to look at more closely and develop a better approach to providing security. because there part of the problem is the host countries are not very good at providing that kind of security. >> is there a -- it seems this is so much of a distance in time challenge that when it happens, how quickly can we respond? how far away are we? is there a almost like a playbook for the ambassadors for the people in those facilities that here's the steps to follow. jump on them immediately if it dpunlt click we go this or that? >> the best playbook the general responded this as well. the best playbook is an ambassador who says, we have got serious security problems h
concerning nuclear weapons, libya, mali, tunisia and egypt are in various states of unrest which we have no strategy. we are the most unsettled period since the end of the cold war. i have serious concerns as to the quality of senator hagel's professional judgment in the acuity of his views on critical areas of national security including security in the east asia and the middle east. his record on iraq is particularly troubling. as i alluded a moment ago in 2002 he voted to authorize the use of force against iraq. by 2006, the support for the war diminished after republican losses in the 2006 midterm elections. he wrote an opinion piece for "the washington post" under the title "leaving iraq honorable "foreforeshadowing. and president bush announced the decision to surge troops in 2007, senator hagel actively campaigned against it. he voted in february of 2007, in favor of a bill expressing opposition to the surge and in favor of measures to troops from iraq and equally bad policy. he wrote in the 2008 memoir, america our next chapter in historically show that the legislative efforts to
supports basic freedoms in the arab world and will continue to work on places like egypt and tunisia so that the muslim identity of its citizens can be preserved and the democratic aspirations of its people can be realized. as far as the convoy, you know, i'm not privy to intelligence about what the convoy contained. i suspect that either included missile technology or wmd, or israel would not have felt compelled to attack the convoy across the border into syria. and that kind of preemptive action when it comes to offensive weapons or wmd. in my mind it is entirely justified and the united states would be entirely right supporting it. >> thank you, david. your remarks indicate a fastening both this is. it's a great preview to reading it. i look forward to doing exactly that. there's one issue that has been in the literature heavily debated about kosovo, and i think you're in a very good position to clarify the issue. what you've already said makes a negotiated agreement very unlikely, remarks at milosevic were not promising for a negotiated agreement. other scholars have suggested that
. we in the united states have an economy today where we are more unequal than either egypt or tunisia. the inequality is growing. the middle class has been struggling. and again, the gains have gone right up to the very top. we can change that but we have got to have a clear understanding of what we mean by growth so that when we implement our economic policies we do so in a way that helps the great majority of the people. i will give you one example that illustrates this and i am not picking on this family, it is a great family, just using them as an example. spam and bud walton founded walmart, and their errors and the next generation between the two of them have five children and one daughter in law. the six individuals now have greater combined net worth than 1 hundred million americans, the bottom third of our country and again it is not the waltons's fault. it is the result of the policies that are producing this pattern. inequality is growing in europe, japan, inequality is growing in china, growing in indiana and one of the reasons is the emergence of outsourcing and robotssou
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5